Recipe Friday: Pecan Pie

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Hi all!! With the holidays coming I figured I would post a classic recipe I am sure almost everyone loves: Pecan Pie!! I know I do and my husband is always waiting for this time of year just for that. A lot of people think it is difficult but to be honest it is one of the simplest pie recipes I know. Enjoy!!

Pecan Pie

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups white sugar
  • 1/4 cup dark corn syrup
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1 tablespoon cold water
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/4 cups chopped pecans
  • 1 (9 inch) unbaked pie shell

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup, butter, water, and cornstarch. Bring to a full boil, and remove from heat.
  3. In a large bowl, beat eggs until frothy. Gradually beat in cooked syrup mixture. Stir in salt, vanilla, and pecans. Pour into pie shell.
  4. Bake in preheated oven for 45 to 50 minutes, or until filling is set.

It’s PI day!!!

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Ok I know it is a bit geeky but hey it is what I live for…geeky things!! And what better way to celebrate PI Day then having a piece of “PIE” !! Have a fun day and enjoy your geeky side a little bit!!

On a side note about March 14….It is also Albert Einstein’s Birthday!! He would have been 139 years old.

 

 

HAPPY PI DAY!!!

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Ok I have to get my geek on. Today is the official day for that pesky little number that we have to use to determine the diameter of a circle 3.14!! Here are a few little tidbits of history about PI

  • The ancient Babylonians generally calculated the area of a circle by taking 3 times the square of its radius (pi=3), but one Old Babylonian tablet (from ca. 1900-1680 BCE) indicates a value of 3.125 for pi.
  • Ancient Egyptians calculated the area of a circle by the following formula (where d is the diameter of the circle): formula:  [(8d)/9] squaredThis yields an approximate value of 3.1605 for pi.
  • The first theoretical calculation of a value of pi was that of Archimedes of Syracuse (287-212 BCE), one of the most brilliant mathematicians of the ancient world. Archimedes worked out that 223/71 < pi < 22/7. Archimedes’s results rested upon approximating the area of a circle based on the area of a regular polygon inscribed within the circle and the area of a regular polygon within which the circle was circumscribed.
  • A novel way to compute pi:  An eighteenth-century French mathematician named Georges Buffon devised a way to calculate pi based on probability. Buffon’s method begins with a uniform grid of parallel lines, a unit distance apart. If you drop a needle of length k < 1 on the grid, the probability that the needle falls across a line is 2k/pi. Various people have tried to calculate pi by throwing needles. Depending on when you stop the experiment, you can obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of pi.
  • The symbol for PI was introduced by the British mathematician William Jones in 1706, who wrote:

    3.14159 =pi

    This symbol was adopted by Euler in 1737 and became the standard symbol for pi.

source for info:  http://ualr.edu/lasmoller/pi.html

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Ok enough of the geekiness 🙂 ….lets go have some PIE!! Have a great PI DAY!!!

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